Horror on the high street: ‘Experiences over things’ revs up retail apocalypse

Increasingly we are seeing a trend towards consumers valuing ‘experiences over things’ and this is having an impact on the performance of certain sectors. There have been a string of high street casualties in recent weeks, with a number of household names falling into administration. Other brands have been forced to seek help through Company Voluntary Agreements – arrangements with their creditors usually to try and improve lease terms on stores.

Restaurants are not immune to the squeeze in consumer discretionary spending, so while the growth in the sector may seem counterintuitive compared with headlines seen in recent months, it is in particular mid-market chains that are shrinking. We see greater consumer appetite for healthier eating, informal and experiential dining and an increased focus on food provenance and sustainability.

These trends are not unique to the UK, in the US footwear and apparel sales are also lagging other sectors. We believe these trends will materialise at different paces in different countries but for now the ‘experiences over things’ idea remains very much a developed market phenomenon.

Anna Martinez – fixed income analyst. Newton, a BNY Mellon company

Increasingly we are seeing a trend towards consumers valuing ‘experiences over things’ and this is having an impact on the performance of certain sectors. There have been a string of high street casualties in recent weeks, with a number of household names falling into administration. Other brands have been forced to seek help through Company Voluntary Agreements – arrangements with … read more

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The revolution set to save industries $421bn per year

Industry 4.0 – our name for the fourth Industrial Revolution – uses smart technology to enhance manufacturing processes, making them more efficient and more easily adaptable to customer needs. It promises the integration of automation, data, analytics and manufacturing to deliver new business and operating models. Computers and robotics will come together in an entirely new way in ‘smart factories’. Robots will be connected remotely to digital systems equipped with machine learning algorithms. These systems will analyse information coming from the shop floor and control the production line, making decisions with minimal input from human beings.

Future production lines will employ a fraction of the people currently needed, so the impetus for production to happen in low-wage locations may become less important. There may also be a greater need for software engineers who can monitor increasingly complex systems on-site and less need for manual labour.

For these reasons, Industry 4.0 could mean greater investment in production within Europe and the US. As a consequence, the production shift in the late 20th and early 21st centuries to low-wage economies, such as Mexico and Bangladesh, may be reversed. Inevitably, a revolution on this scale will likely shift economic distribution, both from country to country as well as from labour to capital. This could be the most material long-term consequence of Industry 4.0.

Walter Scott Global Equities team

Industry 4.0 – our name for the fourth Industrial Revolution – uses smart technology to enhance manufacturing processes, making them more efficient and more easily adaptable to customer needs. It promises the integration of automation, data, analytics and manufacturing to deliver new business and operating models. Computers and robotics will come together in an entirely new way in ‘smart factories’. … read more

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The risk business: towards a new paradigm?

Geopolitical analysis is an essential piece of investment management that many firms currently neglect. We think markets are not fairly pricing the level of current and potential global geopolitical risk due to distortions such as central bank liquidity. Another explanation for the recent complacency toward geopolitical risk is the rise of exchange-traded funds (ETFs), which has distorted capital flows into equities. However, recent price action of political risk-off assets including gold, the Swiss franc, the Japanese yen and the “Defence” Index (Dow Jones US Select Aerospace & Defence Index) is becoming more acute in response to the most recent geopolitical events. In short, geopolitical risk is starting to get noticed, and we believe active equity asset managers are well positioned to capture the benefits and avoid the pitfalls.

Jim Lydotes – portfolio manager and Richard Bullock – senior analyst. BNY Mellon Asset Management North America

Geopolitical analysis is an essential piece of investment management that many firms currently neglect. We think markets are not fairly pricing the level of current and potential global geopolitical risk due to distortions such as central bank liquidity. Another explanation for the recent complacency toward geopolitical risk is the rise of exchange-traded funds (ETFs), which has distorted capital flows into … read more

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