Against the grain: Which emerging market’s fund industry grew 50% in a year?

Historically, some 30% of Indian GDP has been in savings – typically gold and property – but demonetisation in November 2016 and the Aadhaar scheme are, together, encouraging these savings into the financial system. Moreover, this environment of plentiful liquidity is driving down funding costs for lenders and spurring the fees of businesses related to asset management.

Around 60,000 mutual fund accounts are being opened every day in India, and Indian mutual funds have almost doubled their assets under management (AUM) in just over three years.

The Indian mutual funds market has gone through three distinct phases over the past 13 years, with compound annual growth rates (CAGR) improving markedly over the past three years, on the back of higher market returns and stronger flows following demonetisation last November.

Given that the penetration of mutual funds in India as a proportion of GDP is less than a quarter of the global average, and below that of many other emerging markets, we believe there is a long ‘runway’ for growth in this area.

Sophia Whitbread – portfolio manager on the Newton Emerging and Asian Equities team. Newton, a BNY Mellon company.

Historically, some 30% of Indian GDP has been in savings – typically gold and property – but demonetisation in November 2016 and the Aadhaar scheme are, together, encouraging these savings into the financial system. Moreover, this environment of plentiful liquidity is driving down funding costs for lenders and spurring the fees of businesses related to asset management. Around 60,000 mutual … read more

  • Download
  • Print
0 comments | Join the conversation, comment now
In emerging markets, managing foreign exchange risk is critical

One major change in recent years is how policy makers in many emerging markets have become comfortable with using currency as a buffer to insulate their economies from negative shocks. Among the first lines of defence against any political, economic or external shock is to allow currency weakness, with authorities only stepping in to counter falls once they become significant enough for inflation pass-through to become a concern. As such, management of currency risk in order to control volatility and avoid potential losses has become even more important.

Colm McDonagh – head of EM fixed income. Insight investment, a BNY Mellon company

One major change in recent years is how policy makers in many emerging markets have become comfortable with using currency as a buffer to insulate their economies from negative shocks. Among the first lines of defence against any political, economic or external shock is to allow currency weakness, with authorities only stepping in to counter falls once they become significant … read more

  • Download
  • Print
0 comments | Join the conversation, comment now
New Year, clean slate? Why 2018 will be the year of investing in renewables

The transition to green energy is accelerating, with 2018 expected to deliver new investment opportunities as technological innovation and falling costs drive further momentum for change.

What started as a government-subsidised process to decarbonise the power sector is now shifting to a process driven by expenditure and economics. Over the next 12 months, as the cost of clean technology continues to fall, we expect to see an acceleration in investment, in both developed economies and fast-growing industrialising nations.

Against this backdrop, the ability of renewables to deliver what we think are stable and sustainable income streams, means they are likely to remain an attractive source of dividends and total returns.

For a full article on the renewables revolution, visit our Markets 2018 website.

Paul Flood – fund manager and strategist. Newton, a BNY Mellon company

The transition to green energy is accelerating, with 2018 expected to deliver new investment opportunities as technological innovation and falling costs drive further momentum for change. What started as a government-subsidised process to decarbonise the power sector is now shifting to a process driven by expenditure and economics. Over the next 12 months, as the cost of clean technology continues … read more

  • Download
  • Print
0 comments | Join the conversation, comment now